The final weeks leading up to the launch of a brand-new mobile app can be a lot like the final week before Christmas. There is a certain excitement in the air, a hope of wonderful things on that magical day. Finally, the day arrives and the app launches. What follows a few brief hours of development euphoria is a lot like the emotions of December 26. In a word: letdown.

At the offices of iTexico, an Austin, Texas software developer and nearshore outsourcing provider, developers are all too familiar with post-launch letdown. It is something they have to fight on a regular basis. Even when a mobile app fully meets all the expectations of both iTexico and the customer, there is always the task of picking up and starting over with a new project in the days following the launch of a completed project. Letdown is always a possibility.

iTexico developers offer the following tips for avoiding post-launch letdown:

 

  • Do Not Believe in the Field of Dreams

 

Just like it is not healthy for adults to continue believing in Santa Claus, app developers should avoid the temptation of falling for the ‘Field of Dreams’ trap. It’s not true that just because you build it, they will come. There are literally millions of apps offered in both the Google and Apple stores that never see the light of day.

If you are an independent developer, be realistic in your level of optimism. Your hard work may turn out to produce the next killer app to revolutionize an industry. Then again, it might not. Do not get discouraged. Pick yourself up and try again. As for employed developers working for companies like iTexico, the only thing that matters is customer satisfaction.

 

  • Do Not Obsess over Features

 

How many features does a mobile app need? Only as many as are necessary to provide full functionality. Too many app developers obsess over features to the point of creating bloated messes that turn users away. The best rule of thumb is to make a mobile app as lean as possible at launch. If users want more features, they will let developers know with their reviews.

 

  • Do Not Obsess over Launch Day

 

While launch day is certainly something to look forward to, it is not the end goal. The end goal is to create a piece of software that meets the needs of its end-users with as few bugs as possible. It may take you a little bit longer than you anticipated to reach that point. You might also get done more quickly than you had planned. What is most important is the finished product, not the day on which it launches.

 

  • Do Not Measure Traffic

 

Internet marketing has trained us all to believe that generating traffic is the most important goal of doing things online. It’s not. Just like a lot of through traffic can bog down a city like New York, lots of through traffic doesn’t help a mobile app if end-users are passing by without downloading, installing, and using it.

Traffic is important, but not as important as conversion. Therefore, don’t measure the success of an app by the number of people who visit a landing page or preview your app in the store. Success should always be measured by the number of active downloads and the conversation your app generates.

Even at busy companies like iTexico, the risk of letdown is ever present. Letdown is not inevitable though. With the right mindset and a passion for great software development, any software developer can move from one project to the next with his/her head held high.

Dean@techsophist.net'